Aboriginal Education: Fulfilling the Promise by Lynne Davis, Marlene Brant Castellano, Louise Lahache

By Lynne Davis, Marlene Brant Castellano, Louise Lahache

Aboriginal humans in Canada and in other places have unquenchable wish within the promise of schooling. This selection of papers grew out of chosen learn studies and around desk papers commissioned by means of the Royal fee on Aboriginal Peoples.

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Additionally, Kwiya calls for the establishment of an Indian education commission to represent the interests of Indian people: “The Government of Yukon, in the past, has not responded to suggestions for reform in support of Indian education concerns. There is a need for the Government to demonstrate leadership by initiating new policy directions. These changes must be accompanied by a demonstrated willingness to work with the Indian community. The Commission has recommended the establishment of an Indian Education Commission to fulfill this immediate requirement” (Yukon Joint Commission on Indian Education and Training 1987, 38).

Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11 (1&2): 5-36. Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP). 1996. Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, Vol. 3: Gathering Strength. Ottawa: Canada Communications Group. Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP). 1997. Lauzon, Iris. Ojibway Language and Immersion Program for Pre-Schoolers. Winnipeg, Manitoba, 22 April 1992. In For Seven Generations: An Information Legacy of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. CD-ROM.

Heavy emphasis on extensive consultations is evident throughout the documents of this period. It is important to note, however, that many of the consultative processes used in the preparation of the documents were conducted by provincial government officials. Thus, while efforts were made to base the reports on the view of the Aboriginal persons, communities, and organizations consulted, these views were incorporated into the various reports by government officials. Some reports, such as Learning: Tradition and Change (Northwest Territories Special Committee on Education 1982) and Kwiya: Towards a New Partnership in Education (Yukon Joint Commission on Indian Education and Training 1987), the latter being chaired by a representative from the Council for Yukon Indians, rely heavily on direct excerpts from the consultations.

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